Favourite books, and currently reading

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Don Fatale
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Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2018 6:55 am

Favourite books, and currently reading

Post by Don Fatale » Wed Apr 18, 2018 12:26 pm

I found this one very entertaining. Particularly given that it covers the excitement of the first performances at Bayreuth with well known people from around the world converging on the place.

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Van der Decken
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Re: Favourite books, and currently reading

Post by Van der Decken » Wed Apr 18, 2018 11:00 pm

Here is a good one. Has complete English libretto. Pretty sure it is the libretto from Goodall's Ring too.
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"Pray heaven that soon a wife will keep faith with him!" Senta speaking of the Hollander.
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Van der Decken
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Re: Favourite books, and currently reading

Post by Van der Decken » Thu Apr 19, 2018 12:44 am

Another good one that I have.
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"Pray heaven that soon a wife will keep faith with him!" Senta speaking of the Hollander.
Parsifal
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Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2018 9:11 pm
Location: Oregon. USA

Re: Favourite books, and currently reading

Post by Parsifal » Thu Apr 19, 2018 1:15 am

Van der Decken wrote:
Wed Apr 18, 2018 11:00 pm
Here is a good one. Has complete English libretto. Pretty sure it is the libretto from Goodall's Ring too.
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The Goodall Ring does use the Porter translation. It's a "singing" translation that strives for comprehensibility and uses modern English, avoiding the archaisms of most earlier translations. That's probably a good approach, despite the fact that Wagner's original uses some intentional archaism, and not the everyday German spoken by Germans then or now, in order to create a primitive or legendary atmosphere. The one aspect of the Ring's special linguistic style which I miss in the Porter translation is Wagner's alliteration (in old German literature, "Stabreim"). Porter does make some attempt in this direction, but largely without the rhetorical force of the original. It's really an impossible assignment, so niggling criticism would be ungracious.
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